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Summary - Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

The text is the summary of recent articles on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis from National Library of Medicine (NLM). This information is subject to NCBI's Disclaimer and Copyright notice.

Neutrophils in children with the polyarticular form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) display abnormal transcriptional patterns linked to fundamental metabolic derangements. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the commonest rheumatic disease in children and JIA-associated uveitis its most frequent extra-articular manifestation. Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is considered as a polygenic autoinflammatory disease. Over the past two decades, the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has been revolutionized by the increased tendency toward early aggressive interventions and the availability of the novel biologic medications. In the past decades, we have gained important insights into the mechanisms of disease and therapy underlying chronic inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Few controlled studies are available to guide treatment decisions in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). To characterize peripheral blood T cells in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis (JIAU).Blood samples were taken from children with JIAU (n = 18), JIA without ocular involvement (n = 11), idiopathic anterior uveitis (IAU, n = 12), and healthy controls (n = 11). To evaluate the relationship between expression of Myxovirus-resistance protein A (MxA) protein on muscle biopsies by immunohistochemistry and disease activity in JDM patients. Vitamin D has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Medical registries and registry studies are frequently used for health services research as they represent a valuable means of capturing real-life data. Hip involvement is common and estimated to occur in approximately 35-63% of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Alongside recent advances in treatment strategies for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), paediatric rheumatologists have taken increasing interest in the use of imaging. Inflammation and damage in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) often develop without clinical symptoms but can lead to severe facial growth abnormalities and impaired health-related quality of life, making early diagnosis of TMJ changes crucial to identify. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), imaging is increasingly used in clinical practice. Wrist involvement occurs in about one-quarter of patients diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), increasing to 40% 5 years after diagnosis. Intraarticular corticosteroid (IAC) injections are often used to treat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). It is reported that alterations in protein glycosylation are present in adult rheumatic diseases; however, the data related to pediatric rheumatic conditions are very scarce. Cytokine genes, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), are known to play important roles in the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). About 70 genetic studies have already addressed the need of biomarkers to predict the response of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to methotrexate (MTX) treatment.

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